School as a Prison and Fear of the Teacher

Education 

The KGM is of the view that we keep repeating the same formula from the 20th-century: teachers transmitting a rigid and basic knowledge that gives students, no matter their motivation, interests, or abilities, little to no direction. In this way, we are replicating, literally, prisons, with no room for an integral, flexible, and versatile education.

“What do you think of when you’re in a space with closed doors and a hallway where you can’t enter without permission or a bell that tells you when you can enter and leave?” 

The fact that global educational models are being questioned and put in various forms of transformation is nothing new.  

Transformations in education happens slowly and with time. Curiously, they’re typically ignited by those who grew up in now-defunct educational systems and their results will be seen by generations not even in existence. This is an obsolete system.  

So, in this era of information technology and innovation, citizens are demanding changes in their educational models to better fit their societies and distinct idiosyncrasies. The KGM is therefore inspired to create an educational system that would address the future of our young people.  

We are limiting ourselves by continuing to use the “prison” model and by falling back on the old 20th-century formula of teachers passing on rigid and uninspiring knowledge to students with no concern for their different interests or abilities.

Nevertheless, this is the 21st century, the informational age, and teachers are no longer the guardians of the knowledge gateway. With the new generations growing up with near limitless access to the internet, teachers must take on the role of a guide rather than a gatekeeper, helping students along their educational journey rather than dragging them kicking and screaming. Of course, this shift in the educational paradigm has physical repercussions as well:

 Schools should foster a feeling of community, where “students have the necessary space and tools to meet in groups of all sizes and participate in active learning,” and where “students are no longer anonymous and avoid problems with coexistence. These places are where the director and the teachers really get to know their students.” The classrooms will be circular and have everything needed to encourage active learning, from furniture that promotes collaboration among the pupils, to readily available electronic devices, to laboratories for projects. 

THEREFORE THE KINGDOM GOVERNMENT INTRODUCES A  SYSTEM THAT IS MORE CONDUCIVE TO THE 21ST CENTURY IN THE STUDY ENVIRONMENT AND IN THE CURRICULUM THAT IS…WATSON!